Five Ways to Organize your Life

I’m a wreck. I tend to set things down in weird places and just forget about them, or I’ll reorganize something then forget how I did it and loose everything. I don’t just do this at home, I do it at work too.

Over the years, I’ve gotten better and keeping my stuff together, but I was only able to do it with a plethora of tools. If you need some quick and easy ways to organize your stuff, just ask someone who’s a functioning mess. Here are five tools to keep your stuff together:

One: A Carabiner + The Tile Bluetooth Tracker

Okay, this is technically two tools, I’m gonna count it as one. I am the emergency key keeper in my family, meaning that everyone gives me a key to their things ‘in case of an emergency’. Unfortunately, I’m also really good at losing my keys.

So, after I finally got tired of fumbling over all of my keys and losing them all the time, I bought two things: A carabiner and a Bluetooth tracker. I sorted all of my keys into different key rings, then put them on the carabiner. My family’s keys are on one ring, my keys and the Tile tracker are on another, the keys to my work place are on a third and my pepper spray is on it’s own ring.

This means that I don’t have to mess around with keys I hardly use, and I never have to lose them again. Read about my Bluetooth tracker here.

Two: Drawer Organizers

Just because you can’t see it, doesn’t mean that it’s not a mess. My drawers used to subconsciously stress me out until I took the steps to organize them and (the most important part) keep them that way.  For bigger drawers, I suggest these adjustable bamboo organizers, but a simple Amazon search will bring up a wide verity of drawer organizers for all shapes and sizes.

Organize your kitchen, desk, sock and junk drawers with these, and never have to dig through your drawers again.

Three: Trunk Caddies

When my car had an oil and coolant leak, I used to keep extra bottles of the substances in my trunk so I could refill them if I needed to. However, when I took sharp turns, I could hear them tumble around in the back. I realized that If I didn’t’ find a way to secure them, they would burst open all over my car. To prevent this, I bought a Trunk Caddie.

After a while, I started putting more things in it, like a first aid kit, a small tool box and a small bag with extra clothes, just in case (you never know what could happen). Once I started grocery shopping more often, I found it to be super helpful for carrying gallons of milk and other heavy, potentially leak prone items.

Four: Portable File Box

I like to keep my documents. Whether they’re for my car, school, my medical records or just the manuals to the things I buy, I like to keep them just in case I’ll need them later. After a while, I got tired of having 80 different places I might keep my files, so I went to Walmart and bought a file box.

Now, I have a great, semi-secure place to put my cars maintenance records, my medical documents and other similar things.

(Keep in mind that Social Security cards, Birth certificates and things like that should be kept somewhere more secure)

Five: A Giant Wall Calendar

I use this to remind myself of important dates, such as doctors’ appointments, birthdays, pay days and payment due dates. While I used Google Calendar for the smaller reminders, it’s incredibly helpful to me to physically see when I get paid and when I have to spend money laid out on the wall for me.

I’m able to keep track of how many payments I have in between paydays, calculate about how much I’d be paying each month and leave little notes to myself in the margins. This is by far one of my favorite tools. It’s a small thing that makes a huge impact on my life.

While there are tons of tips and tricks to keep your stuff organized, keep in mind that you’re the only one who can find something that truly works for you. Everyone makes messes in their own ways, so we all have to find our own ways to keep track of everything too.

Characteristics of Great Managers

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When you’re going into management, it’s important to commit yourself to being a good manager. People who are good at managing have easier shifts, get more things done and they can do it all with the support of their employees.

My advice to you: Think back to one of your favorite bosses (I’m talking about the one that was your favorite because it was always nice working with them, not the one you loved because they didn’t enforce the rules), and think about everything that made them great to work with. I can promise you that all great managers have these things in common:

They Don’t Let Outside Factors Influence Their Performance at Work

Everyone has a hard day. Everyone has days where they come into work in a bad mood. That’s okay. When this happens, get to work five minutes early. Sit in your car and try to clear your head. If that doesn’t work, give yourself an hour on the clock. If the mood doesn’t go away, the best thing to do is to let your coworkers know that you’ve had a rough day and that your actions might display that. This makes it easier to sympathize.

Keep in mind that your attitude is going to affect the quality of the shift or project for everyone else, not just you.

They’re a Leader, Not a Boss

A leader is someone who shows the employees that they’re able to do the work by helping out when they’re needed. A boss is someone who sits behind a desk and yells orders. People tend to respect the manager who’s willing to help with the dirty work more than one who thinks that ‘they’re above it’.

When managing, it’s best to always take on a ‘do as I do, not as I say’ type of mentality because when it comes down to it, your employees are going to mimic you.

They Respect Their employees

It’s a two-way street. Employees seek respect in the forms of having their availability honored, being given the time off that they need (i.e. not being called in on their only day off), and being recognized for great work. It also means understanding when an employee has a bad day and isn’t performing like they usually do.

If they see these things, they’re more likely to respect you when you take some time off or when you have a bad day.

Tip: A really easy way to show respect is to acknowledge your coworkers when they arrive and when they leave. A simple “Hey! Welcome to work,” or “Have a great night, I’ll see you tomorrow,” can mean a lot to an employee.

They Don’t Mix up Being a Manager and Being a Friend.

It’s important to be friendly, but it’s hard to be friends with the people your managing. You have to hold everyone the same standards or it’ll seem like your picking favorites. If your friends with your employees, they’re already one of your favorites and you’re more likely to be biased towards them.

It can mean a lot to a coworker if you take an interest in their personal lives and can ask them about it when you see them next, but you can do that without being a friend.

They’re Understanding

It’s important for employees to know that if life gets in their way, you’ll be cool about it. This means not demanding someone to be at work even though they’re sick, letting someone take the day off because their dog died, or forgiving someone who has a perfect attendance record for being late one time.

It’s important to be understanding, but don’t be a pushover.

If someone needs a day off for a reason that’s not a sudden illness or family emergency, make it clear that they need to give you x amount of notice or that they need to find someone to cover their shift. If the person is always late, it’s okay to put your foot down and tell them that they need to start showing up on time.

They Can Make a Solid Decision.

Decision-making skills are crucial for managers. You have to be able to make decisions on the fly and be sure that it’s the right one. This is something that most managers seem to struggle with (including myself), and it can lead to a lot of confusion when you’re working.

When you make a decision, stick to it until you realize that it’s not working, then be venerable enough to admit that you were wrong and try again.

Tip: If you’re bad at making decisions on the fly, try to plan out what you’d do if everything goes correctly before the day starts. Then make a plan B because nothing really ever goes right. A plan C isn’t a bad idea either.

They Can Admit When They’re Wrong and Take Advice from Their Employees

When I first started my managing job at a new Starbucks, my coworkers would show appreciation towards my ability to bring in new ideas, but also work with how they’ve run shifts in the past.

Because I respected their routines and took their advice on the easiest way to run a shift at the store, I was able to fall right into a new crowd of people and be respected for my management. However, I wouldn’t have been able to do that if I believed that my way was the only right way.

Another thing to remember is that as a manager, you specialize in managing and running things. This often leads to gaps in your knowledge of how things can work on an employee’s level. When you’re called to cover for one, let them coach you on how to do it. It’ll make everyone’s lives a lot easier and bring up their level of respect.

Being a manager is less about leading with an iron fist and more about creating a culture of understanding and consistent expectations. This leads to an environment where everyone knows what’s going on and what to expect.

Count-Down

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The shrill sound of the alarm clock pulled out Mavis out of sleep.

Only one thought passed through her mind this morning as she woke up. It was a very strong and assertive: No.

She did not want to wake up.

Groggily, she groaned and twisted to turn the stupid shrilling beep off, catching sight of the timer that was engraved her right wrist.

No, this timer wasn’t a watch. It wasn’t counting up to midnight or noon; it was counting down to a certain event. This event varied between two major things in a person’s life; it could either mean the day of someone’s death, or the day they would meet the person they were destined to spend their life with.

After pressing the snooze button, she brought her wrist closer to her face to make sure she was seeing correctly.

Mavis’s clock read eight hours and forty-three minutes.

In roughly nine hours, she was either going to meet the person she would marry or she was going to die

Hopefully, it’s the latter. A small voice said from the back of her head. She pushed it away.

It was true. Mavis didn’t have the best of lives. She was bullied at school because she was a straight A student and her demanding responsibilities at home made it hard to keep up with homework. On top of everything, She would often be her worst critic, judging every inch of herself in the mirror until she felt worthless in both mind and body. High school had taken the best for her, smashed it, and then lit it on fire. She was only a freshman.

She was still incredibly tired, so she attempted to rub the sleep from her face. She shook her head out to try and get rid of the grogginess and then braced for the wall of cold that would assault her when she flipped the blanket off of herself

Once she had done so, she begrudgingly got ready for school knowing that by the end of the day, she’d either be dead or in love.


The day proceeded normally. Her teachers praised her work; the students glared at her and called her a goody-two-shoes.

Someone tripped her during the passing period before lunch, snickering as her papers flew all over the hall. No one stopped to help. They just walked all over her papers in a hurry to get to lunch, leaving dirty footprints as they took their leave.  She fought tears. Her clock now read two hours and fifty-five minutes.

The end of the day ended in art. She was grateful. The teacher let the students listen to music because it boosts creativity, but it also eased Mavis’ anxiety and calmed her nerves. Getting lost in the music and the drawings- even if they weren’t that great- helped her relax and block out the world.

By the end of the day, her timer said 0000:15:98

In fifteen minutes her life would change forever. It seemed like the implications of the entire situation hadn’t caught up to her. She was starting to feel nervous. She would either die or fall in love on her way home from school.

Automatically, her brain started making calculations; the chances of her falling in love while walking home versus the chances of dying.  The odds of dying greatly outweighed the other.

She took a deep breath while collecting her stuff to leave school, already accepting her fate. Deep down, she almost felt grateful it would be over in just a few short minutes.


The man at the crosswalk held his sign across the sidewalk, baring kids from walking into traffic.

The crowd that Mavis had gathered with was particularly large today, but the traffic on the road was no different than normal.

She glanced at her timer again. 0000:01:00. Exactly one minute. Her breathing sped up and fear began to seep into her stomach.

One minute of life left. A car would hit her.

In what seemed to take forever, the guy manning the crosswalk finally walked into traffic with his sign held high. When he had reached the middle, he beckoned for the collection of children on the sidewalk to cross.

Mavis stood, petrified. This is it. She thought. She let everyone pass her. If she was going, she wasn’t going to take anyone with her.

When everyone had passed, she put one foot onto the asphalt, then continued, her breathing speeding up. She wasn’t afraid. She was nervous.

She got most of the way across the crosswalk before several things happened all at once.

The car that was meant to seal her fate was at least two feet away from her. It was going way too fast in a school zone. Mavis saw and accepted that. She made no attempt to move. However, in that moment things seemed to slow down.

As the car got closer and closer, strong arms strung themselves under her armpits, then wrapped around, the person’s hands on her shoulders.  Then, she was yanked back out of the path of the small blue car.

The car whizzed past, barely nicking the edge of her sneaker, all while the guy with the stop sign was blowing his whistle furiously.

Mavis, however, was still being supported by the stranger that had just saved her life. Her knees were too weak to be trusted with her weight.

She was in shock. But… but my timer? She glanced at it again.  0000:00:00

Wide-eyed and terrified, Mavis realized she was still leaning heavily on someone. She looked up at the person who had grabbed her.

“Are you okay?” He asked, his green eyes sparkling with concern.

Mavis nodded slowly at first, like she was still making sure she was okay herself, then faster, knowing that she was, in fact, still okay.  After she had confirmed that, she realized she could stand up again, her knees wobbling slightly.

After she stood up, she looked at her wrist again. 0000:00:00. She should be dead.

Puzzled, she looked up at her savior.

“I assume your timer just ended?” He asked. “Mine too. The name’s Mathew, by the way. Looks like we’re soul mates.” He flashed at her a brilliant smile.

Despite almost dying, Mavis couldn’t help but smile either. It was a shaky smile, but a smile nonetheless.  “Mavis.” She said.

Mathews smile got even bigger. “Awesome.” He held out his elbow in an offer for Mavis to take it. “I’ll walk you across?”

She nodded and hesitantly strung her arm through his.

Yet another realization struck. If Mathew hadn’t had been there, her timer was counting down her death, but because he was, it was counting down to when she’d meet the love of her life.

She looked up at Mathew, mystified.

He noticed her looking and looked back. He rose an eyebrow, but was still smiling. She shook her head.

“Thank you, Mathew.” She said.

Review: Tile Bluetooth Tracker

I have an incredible skill of losing my wallet or my keys in the most random places. It doesn’t matter where I am or what I’m doing, if I set them down, they’re gone. After not being able to find my wallet for a solid three days, I got tired of it and went online for a solution. That’s when I stumbled on The Tile Bluetooth Tracking Device.

Within in a week, I had one. So far, it’s been one of my most useful tools.

How it works

There are several versions of The Tile. I have The Tile Pro for my keys and The Slim for my wallet.

Basically, each device hooks up to the Tile app on your phone via Bluetooth and allows you to ‘call’ it from the app. The device admits a loud, higher pitched jingle that’s easy to hear. One of the really cool benefits is that the tile communicates with the app both ways. For example, if you lose your phone, but have one of the other Tile devices, you can double press the button in the middle and it’ll ring your phone, even if it’s on silent.

Why I choose the Pro and the Slim

The Pro is meant to stand up to some pretty rough conditions, and that’s exactly what I needed. I have a ton of keys on my carabiner and a bad habit of dropping them. I needed something that will stand up to being dropped, thrown around and occasionally stepped on. So far, it’s held up amazingly well. The Pro also has a replaceable battery, which is important to me, because I don’t like to waste things.

I choose The Slim so it could fit in my wallet without adding too much bulk. It fits nicely in one of my card pockets, and I never need to worry about it falling out because of it’s size. Unfortunately, the Slim does not have a replaceable battery. However, each device comes with a one year warranty, so if the battery dies within that you, they will replace it for free.

Ease of Use

Honestly, setting everything up was a pain free and easy process. You download the app, turn on the devices and let your Bluetooth find your devices, then you connect. After that, the rest is a piece of cake. I’ve had more trouble keeping my Bluetooth speaker connected to my phone than I’ve had with the Tile Trackers.

Overall, these little devices have been a game changer for me. I’ve never had a problem with the devices range, and I continue to be able to find my things, no matter where I have left them. I give Tile a solid 10/10 stars.

(This post was not sponsored by Tile. All images where taken off of Tiles website)

A Guide to Confrontation

Somehow, despite all of my anxiety, I’ve always been good at confronting people. However, I’ve never really needed to confront someone until I was promoted. This is when I realized that other people aren’t as comfortable with confrontation. Often times, a barista would come to me and ask me to talk with someone else about something that I’d have no problem bringing up as a barista.

So, how do you confront someone without causing them to be upset?

Take on a Neutral Tone

Wait to approach someone until you’re not angry about the problem anymore. If you try to talk to someone when you’re upset, you’re going to say something that will either hurt the other person or cause a fight.

Think about the problem, the best way to communicate that it’s a problem, and then the solution. Put yourself in that person’s shoes. Would you be more inclined to fix a behavior if someone asked you politely or yelled at you?

Validate the Issue and Explain Why It’s a Problem

When you fail to validate someone’s mistakes, you’re implying that their mistake is stupid or that they can’t make mistakes to learn. Validation makes it seem like the issue is reasonable and explaining why it’s a problem helps them to avoid making a similar mistake in the future.

It’s a lot easier (and meaningful) to hear “Hey, please don’t put the ice bin on the ground. I understand that there isn’t a ton of space on the counter, but it can spread bacteria.” Then “Don’t put the ice bin on the floor.” Not only that but from the former helps them to realize that the floor=bacteria and nothing should be set on the floor.

Provide a Solution

Without a solution, it might be hard for the person to understand how to fix the problem. Telling someone who’s new what the issue is, but not how to solve it will lead to uncertainty and unwillingness to do a task in the future.

The best way to confront someone is clearly and in a way that makes sense. Try to answer all of the questions an employee might have before they get a chance to speak. Going back to the ice bin example:

“Please don’t set the ice bin on the floor.”

“Why?”

“Because it spreads bacteria.”

“Where else should I put it?”

“Clear off some space and put it on the counter.”

Obviously, it’s common sense to set it on the counter instead, but you get the gist.

Some More Tips for Confrontation:

Say “Try this,” or “Next time,”

Not only should your tone be neutral, but so should the language that you use. It’s easier to hear “Try doing it this way,” (a neutral response) than “You need to do it this way” (an almost aggressive response). It also suggests that the person can change the solution, so long as the problem doesn’t arise again.

Saying things like “next time” implies that their mistake won’t matter for very long and that they’d get a chance to fix it in the future because you see their potential.

Avoid Using the Word “You”

“You” is a very accusatory word.  Take the sentence: “You can’t just tell a customer that you don’t have something. You also have to say sorry and offer an alternative.” Now, replace the “Yous” with “We”.

From an employee’s standpoint, it makes them feel less singled out, and it brings you (presumably a manager), down to their level. It implies that you don’t think that they’re beneath you.

To an employee who’s new or struggling, your choice of words could be the difference between a shift full of anxiety or a shift of growth. Feedback is crucial for people to develop in their skills, but first, you have to confront them about it.

How To Let “It” Go

Too many times have people told me that I was “high-strung” and needed to let “it” go. I couldn’t count how many times someone told me that my life would be so much easier if I’d just forget about it and move on.

The fact is, I put too much weight into the things that I’m doing.

I used to go hard with my grades. It was an A or I might as well be failing. I had to be able to present my work to The President of The United States or I might as well not have done it at all. Obviously, this kind of perfectionism isn’t conducive to everyday life, nor is it healthy.

After a solid year of struggling to keep my grades up and work part-time, I became chronically anxious and depressed. Nothing was being completed to my standards, and my work ethic was wavering.

After a while, I realized that I needed to let it go. But how?

Everything in Moderation

First, you need to balance everything. If you have any sort of expectation, you need to give yourself time to meet it. Period, the end.

Put too much effort into school, and you won’t have time for your social life or your health. Too much time into your job and school suffers. Put equal time into both, but don’t give yourself enough time to focus on meeting expectation for either and, well, your mental health is going to take a dive into the deep end.

Leave yourself enough time to actually sleep. To shower occasionally or shave your unibrow. Otherwise, these are just a few more expectations to stress about not being able to do because of time.  Expectations are hard. Take time to meet them.

Recognize What Your Time is Worth

But don’t get cocky about it. Some people feel obligated to take on their bosses role after they leave.

Don’t.

If you’re looking to be promoted to that position, go for it, but make it clear that that’s what you want. Otherwise, it’s fine to help out occasionally, but if you take on their job, plus yours, you’ll just stress yourself out. Then, when they hire somebody to fill the position, you probably won’t be recognized for your work, either.

It’s okay to say no to other people’s things to balance your own.

Don’t be so Hard on Yourself

You are human. No one expects perfection from you, just competence. In an environment with teams, let yourself be really good at one or two things so you can complement your team members’ abilities. Their strengths will complement you in turn

If something goes awry, don’t berate yourself. You can be stressed, but you need to learn how to take a giant mistake as a learning experience, rather than a reason to hate yourself. Figure out the flaw, take the steps to fix it, then follow through and make sure it stays fixed.

Leave yourself enough time to actually sleep. To shower occasionally or shave your unibrow. Otherwise, these are just a few more expectations to stress about not being able to do because of time.  Expectations are hard. Take time to meet them.

Recognize What Your Time is Worth

But don’t get cocky about it. Too many people take on the role of someone in the position above them because they feel obligated to.

Don’t.

If you’re looking to be promoted to that position, go for it, but make it clear that that’s what you want. Otherwise, it’s fine to help out occasionally, but if you take on their job, plus yours, you’ll just stress yourself out. Then, when they hire somebody to fill in the spot, you probably won’t be recognized for your work, either.

It’s okay to say no to other people’s things to balance your own.

Don’t be so Hard on Yourself

You are human. No one expects perfection from you, just that you’re competent. In an environment with teams, let yourself be really good at one thing so you can fill in the weaknesses of your team. Their strengths will fill in your weaknesses in turn.  

If something goes awry, don’t berate yourself. You can be stressed, but you need to learn how to take a giant mistake as a learning experience, rather than a reason to hate yourself. Figure out the flaw, take the steps to fix it, then follow through and make sure it stays fixed.

Ask for Help

It’s okay to ask for help. Sometimes, the weight of everything becomes overwhelming, and it feels like it might crush you. There’s nothing wrong with that. You’re human, remember? We evolved as social creatures. It’s literally in our genes to rely on our community for help.

If it’s money, swallow your pride and ask your parents for help with gas for a month, or your lowest utility bill. Boom, $40+ more that you have to work with.

Work? Ask for a day off or to get a shift covered. Take an extra day to take care of yourself. I promise that your boss would want you to take a day off then come back as a competent employee rather than you just show but just to be there. Or, ask a coworker if they have an hour to spare to help you organize things.

Ask for Help

It’s okay to ask for help. Sometimes, the weight of everything becomes overwhelming, and it feels like it might crush you. There’s nothing wrong with that. You’re human, remember? We evolved as social creatures. It’s literally in our genes to rely on our community for help.

If it’s money, swallow your pride and ask your parents for help with gas for a month, or your lowest utility bill. Boom, $40+ more that you have to work with.

Work? Ask for a day off or to get a shift covered. Take an extra day to take care of yourself. I promise that your boss would want you to take a day off then come back as a competent employee rather than one that shows up just to be there  Or, ask a coworker if they have an hour to spare to help you organize things.

Work? Ask for a day off or to get a shift covered. Take an extra day to take care of yourself. I promise that your boss would want you to take a day off then come back as a competent employee rather than you just show but just to be there. Or, ask a coworker if they have an hour to spare to help you organize things.

Is it school? This can be hard, but sometimes you just need to drop a class. Free up some of your time to do homework, to catch up on some material, to breathe. School is hard. Don’t overburden yourself.

Is it school? This can be hard, but sometimes you just need to drop a class. Free up some of your time to do homework, to catch up on some material, to breathe. School is hard. Don’t overburden yourself.

Mental illness? You don’t even have to leave your house anymore. A quick Google search will bring up several websites for online therapists, or if you can’t afford one, try reaching out to someone who has a similar issue. Online support groups exist for that reason.

All in all, learning to let “it” go takes time and a serious mental reset. You have to train yourself to realize what’s worth stressing over and what’s not. That’s up to you, but once you’ve figured it out, everything will get a lot easier.

Is it school? This can be hard, but sometimes you just need to drop a class. Free up some of your time to do homework, to catch up on some material, to breathe. School is hard. Don’t overburden yourself.

Mental illness? You don’t even have to leave your house anymore. A quick Google search will bring up several websites for online therapists, or if you can’t afford one, try reaching out to someone who has a similar issue. Online supports groups exist for that reason.

All in all, learning to let “it” go takes time and a serious mental reset. You have to train yourself to realize what’s worth stressing over and what’s not. That’s up to you, but once you’ve figured it out, everything will get a lot easier.

First Impression: 2020 Presidential Candidates

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In about a year, the people of the United States are going to be hitting the voting booths in an attempt to pick the best possible candidate for the United States President. Candidates are already lining up; newspapers are starting to compile research and people are picking sides.

This is the first time that I’ve ever been able to vote and I want to make sure I’m going into the next election with a solid preference and an educated reason why I support that candidate. I figured they best way to start who to see who was already running.

After a quick google search, I found a list of potential candidates compiled by the New York Times. Each person had a couple of key running points, a few of their issues and a quote pertaining to why they want to be president.

So far, there are 25 candidates running, 23 of which are Democrat, and only 2 are Republican.

Democrat:
BennetBidenBooker
BullockButtigiegCastro
De BlasioDemaneyGabbard
GillibrandHarrisHickenlooper
Inslee KlobucharMessam
MoultonO’RourkeRyan
SandersSwalwellWarren
WilliamsonYang
Republican
TrumpWeld

Let’s a take a look at each one.

As I read each individuals quote, I immediately ruled out people who seemed to want to be president just to get Trump out of office, people who seem to push a certain agenda, or who seem like they might divide our country rather than bring it together.

Democrat:
BennetBidenBooker
BullockButtigiegCastro
De BlasioDemaneyGabbard
GillibrandHarrisHickenlooper
Inslee KlobucharMessam
MoultonO’RourkeRyan
SandersSwalwellWarren
WilliamsonYang
Republican
TrumpWeld

The next thing I did was look for people who seemed qualified. It’s appropriate for the person who would be running our country to have a background in politics or to have started and built a business from the ground up. I ruled out anyone who doesn’t meet these guidelines. There were only two people who didn’t fit for this category, but I also ruled out Messam because his quote was very off-putting (he wanted to be our “Champion”).

Democrat:
BennetBidenBooker
BullockButtigiegCastro
De BlasioDemaneyGabbard
GillibrandHarrisHickenlooper
Inslee KlobucharMessam
MoultonO’RourkeRyan
SandersSwalwellWarren
WilliamsonYang
Republican
TrumpWeld

After all of this, there are twelve Democrats left, and two Republicans.

Democrat:

Cory Booker, Senator from New Jersey; former mayor of Newark

Michael Bennet,
Senator from Colorado

Pete Buttigieg, Mayor of South Bend, Ind.; military veteran

Bill de Blasio, Mayor of New York City

John Delaney, Former congressman from Maryland; former businessman

Tulsi Gabbard, Congresswoman from Hawaii; Army National Guard veteran

Kamala Harris, Senator from California; former attorney general of California; former San Francisco district attorney

John Hickenlooper, Former governor of Colorado; former mayor of Denver

Beto O’Rourke, Former congressman from Texas; 2018 Senate candidate

Tim Ryan, Congressman from Ohio; former congressional staffer

Bernie Sanders, Senator from Vermont; former congressman

Eric Swalwell, Congressman from California

Republican:

Donald J. Trump,U.S. president; real estate developer; reality television star

William F. Weld, Former governor of Massachusetts; former federal prosecutor

Overall, I have to say that so far, I’m shocked with just how many Democrats are running, and I’m very curious to why there’s such a giant imbalance of candidates between Democrats and Republicans.

Fluffy Cream Cheese Omelets

Prep Time: 5 minutes      Cook time: 10 minutes       Serving size: 1 serving

You’ll need:

Small bowl
Three large eggs
A pinch of Baking Soda
Salt and Pepper to taste
Medium Pan
Cooking Spray
2 table spoons of Cream Cheese, chopped
1/3 cup Shredded Cheese
A handful of Green Onions, chopped
1/3 Bell Pepper, chopped

How to do it:

  1. In a small bowl, crack open the three eggs, add baking soda, salt and pepper. Use a fork or a whisk to beat together. Continue to beat for about three minutes, are until the top is covered with bubbles.
  2. Apply cooking spray to your pan, then add the egg mixture on a medium pan on medium heat.
  3. Immediately add the cream cheese squares equal distances apart on one half of the omelet.
  4. Sprinkle on cheese, green onions and bell peppers onto the same half of the omelet.
  5. Let it cook until the egg in the middle isn’t jiggly anymore, then fold, bringing the half without veggies down on the half with the veggies.
  6. After cooking on one side for thirty seconds, flip to other side for thirty more, to ensure that everything has been cooked all the way
  7. Remove omelet from skillet and serve.

There’s no better way to start your day than with a smart, healthy and easy-to-make meal. These omelets are deliciously fluffy, fresh and creamy. A healthy breakfast that’s sure to delight the whole family!

What are We Leaving Behind for Future Anthropologists?

Ever since I took an Anthropology 101 class in my sophomore year of high school, I always wondered what people in the future would be able to learn about us if something catastrophic happened and we all disappeared.

Anthropology is the study of development of human societies and their cultures. Anthropologists learn these things by deducting conclusions from what ancient peoples left behind. They look at everything from their houses, the places they went to entertain themselves, how they obtained their food, and even the trash they left behind to learn as much as they could.

I began trying to do the same thing, changing my perspective so I was objectifying everything I saw while driving down the street, browsing the internet or even talking to people at work. (keep in mind that all of these observations were made where I live and could be different depending on region).

I asked myself: What are some things future anthropologists be able to learn about our society, 500 years from now?

The answer is simple. Just look around you!

We love to document things

We document just about everything. There isn’t a single employer who doesn’t have some sort of information about their employees documented somewhere, whether it’s physical or on a computer. Our dentists, doctors, and therapists all have a file for us, containing everything they need to know to provide the best care possible. Most food and service jobs have documentation for their waste, their inventory and some places even document how often they deposit money to the bank.

We even document things in our personal lives. How much weight we’ve lost, how much we spend day to day, the maintenance records for our cars (take CarFax for example). Even scrapbooking and social media are just much more involved ways to document things.

So. Much. Caffeine.

Take a walk around downtown. It doesn’t matter where you live, just take a walk and count. How many coffee or tea places do you see? How many gas stations convince stores, pharmacies, food trucks or vending machines are selling energy drinks? How many restaurants are there that have caffeinated soft drinks?

Our society relies heavily on caffeine, so much so that you can even find it in medication and our foods. It doesn’t take that much to notice this aspect of our society.  

We love to eat.

Let’s take another walk around downtown. This time count how many places serve food (aside from grocery stores). I don’t just mean restaurants. Look at movie theaters, stadiums, coffee shops, vending machines, food trucks, and venues. They all serve food. Why? Because we eat it!

Not to mention how common it is to have an important meeting over dinner or just meet up with some friends for brunch.

We’re very wasteful.

I have one word: Landfills.

We literally dig giant holes in the ground to throw our trash in, not to mention the other places our trash ends up (*cough, cough* the ocean *cough*). Sit in a park for a little bit. How many trash cans can you count? Keep track of how many single-use plastics you’ve used in a day, or watch your local barista for an hour and see how many cups, lids, straws, milk containers, and other things they throw away.

Look for the articles in magazines that explain what our trash is doing to the wildlife and our environment.

We’re just wasteful, and you can see it everything we do.

Most innovation is centered around our convenience.

We don’t like to be inconvenienced, and as our technology advances, the necessity to inconveniencing ourselves diminishes. Washer and dryers are being made so that they have two doors; you can open the second door as the load is washing to toss in clothes you forgot. All so that you don’t have to press the stop button, wait for it to unlock, put your forgotten clothing item in, and then press the start button.

Our cars have keyless entries and keyless start. Our laptops are being made with longer battery lives, more features and easier way to access things so we don’t have to mess with it too much. TVs were developed to have remotes, and now our remotes have voice commands.

We even have tiny computers we can put in each room of our houses and hook up to all of our other household computers so that we can play music, lock doors, turn on lights, set alarms, order groceries and so, so much more all by saying “Alexa, [insert action here].”

All of these things can be deduced by the tech we leave behind. Think about it for a little bit. What amazing advances in common technology have been made that are solely to ease inconvenience in our day to day lives?

We are very health focused, but not healthy.

Most people try to see the doctor and dentist at least once every six months (the evidence is in our documentation). We have health magazines, scales in every bathroom, and countless websites to help us ‘eat and exercise right’. Our Grocery stores have stickers that say “balance what you eat, drink and do” on the insides of their fridges and there are gyms on what seems to be every other street corner. Log onto Netflix and look at all of the documentaries on sugar, weight gain and eating healthy.

However, our documentation also shows that the majority of people are overweight, and that weight-related health problems are on the rise. Most of our advertisements are for unhealthy foods, and our receipts show that we often opt for convenience rather than health. A lot of our foods are advertised as “low fat/sodium/sugar/cholesterol/carbs/ etc,” but even the nutrition labels betray those claims.

Our society tries to focus on our health, but we’re not healthy.

I-25

There truly is nothing like taking I-25 down into Albuquerque, New Mexico in the middle of summer, I thought bitterly. 

 This drive always brought back memories from when I was a kid. Partially because my dad and I always took this road out of New Mexico when traveling, but also because it never changes. 

The sun seemed to always be shining relentlessly on the already painfully dry desert, the drivers were idiots, weaving in and out of traffic at highway speeds without their blinkers and the air conditioner was unsuccessfully battling the heat that was coming through my very un-tinted windows in what felt like actual waves. Yup, nothing’s changed. I put on my blinker to move into the passing lane, checked my mirror and then glided over. 

I moved out of New Mexico when I was twenty-one with no intentions to go back. New Mexico was always a bit of a financial mess to me. The schools were poor, the public anything was always a mess and underfunded, and of course, when there’s a lack of money, there’s lots of crime. Growing up, I lived on a really good part of town, and we still got our cars broken into twice. Hell, one morning, my dad woke up to find that the tires had been stolen right off his truck- while it sat in our driveway, not even ten feet from the front door.  

The people weren’t that great either. Sure, it was hella diverse and ethnic or whatever, but when you’re the only white kid in a class of 28, you get picked on a lot for “reflecting in the sun” or not being able to tolerate spicy food. Not a big deal, but enough to be annoying after 13 years of school. There was also this giant divide in the population involving politics. Because New Mexico is mostly democratic, if you’re an open republican, be prepared for the worst. Peoples back windows have been smashed in for having right leaning bumper stickers.  

To top it off, I’ve been told that I can’t buy alcohol without an ID issued in the United States in multiple cities across this country before. That’s always a fun conversation to have, and it often ends with me leaving, determined to find a clerk who knows basic seventh grade geography.  

There are some things I think New Mexico has going for it, like the outstandingly beautiful sunsets and rises and the pretty tame weather, but at the end of the day, the half of the population that can look over the high crime and bad school systems love New Mexico, and the half that can’t it is dying to get out.  

I’d been part of the half that was dying to get out.  

So why the heck was I coming back?  

I shook my head as I passed the Sandia Resort and Casino, one of the first signs that you’re getting close to Albuquerque. That was a damn good question.